Facebook Branded These AI Images as ‘Fake News’

Apparently, some believed King Charles had a very bizarre coronation after-party

Elad Simchayoff

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Image made on Midjourney by Guy Gold. This photo was posted on Facebook

A few days ago I got a call from a friend, Guy Gold, who wanted to tell me a weird story that happened to him. For the past few months, he has started spending more and more time with AI tools, especially Midjourney. At first as a hobby. Being a copywriter at a marketing agency he was curious to test the limits of these tools and how they could affect his work. As time passed, both the technology and Gold himself became so good that he started creating complex images for various professional projects.

The story he told began on the day of King Charles III’s coronation. The event was naturally highly traditional, very “buttoned up” as Gold called it. Watching the ancient crown and ceremonial robs he thought of how funny it’ll be to see a different kind of party, a modern, lavish, beach after-coronation party attended by the King. So Gold sat at his computer and went into Midjourney.

He created 16 images in which King Charles could be seen wildly dancing, wearing a bright pink or orange flowered suit and yellow flower neckless. There’s one where the King jumps in the air or another where an image of King Charles is seen dancing in the middle of a pool with people partying in its background. Gold posted these images on a Facebook group called “Midjourney Official”, dedicated to AI creation made by the revolutionary software.

A day passed, and Gold’s post became somewhat viral. Strangely, throughout the Arab world. He said that he suddenly received numerous friend requests and messages from Arab users commenting on his work. One of these messages was from a reporter working for Reuters Arabic. The man asked about the images and their authenticity. Gold replied that these were AI-made, were all done by Midjourney, and posted on a Midjourney Facebook group. Thinking that the Reuters report will be a light-hearted description of the AI artists who made some funny images of the British monarch, Gold waited for the story to break.

The next thing that happened was that Gold discovered his original Facebook post was branded as containing “False Information”.

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Elad Simchayoff

I love writing about what I love. Israeli/British. Father, husband, dog person. Support me by joining Medium via this link: https://eladsi.medium.com/membership